Is it as great to live in Switzerland as they say? I'll tell you about the fly in the ointment in the honey barrel of Swiss life

Is it great to live in Switzerland, as they say? I'll tell you about a fly in the ointment in the honey barrel of Swiss life

From afar, it seems to us that life in Switzerland is not life, but just a fairy tale. Happy cows graze in alpine meadows, luxurious convertibles drive along winding serpentines, and every inhabitant of the country has a multi-million dollar bank account. And indeed, living in Switzerland is very, very comfortable, but everywhere has its drawbacks.

Clearly, everything is known in comparison. If we compare it with conditional Kyrgyzstan, then in terms of the standard of living, everything will immediately become clear. In no case do I want to belittle the merits of Kyrgyzstan, I took the country purely as an example. But if we compare Switzerland with countries from the same “weight category” in terms of living standards and incomes of the population, then some circumstances are revealed not in favor of the latter…

Is it great to live in Switzerland, as they say? I'll tell you about the fly in the ointment in the honey barrel of Swiss life

Zurich

The salaries in Switzerland are incredible. Six thousand francs a month after taxes (read “six thousand euros”) is a perfectly normal average income for a person with a higher education and some experience in their field of activity. But at the same time, the cost of living in the country is very high.

Get some insurance. If you live in a country with a residence permit, then you need to buy insurance every year. There are different types of policies covering different ailments, but the average insurance costs 450 francs per month or 5,400 francs (340,000 rubles) per year. Moreover, if you have this insurance, you will have to pay the first 2,000 francs a year for treatment out of your own pocket, and only then will it cover 90% of the cost of visiting doctors.

Is it great to live in Switzerland, as they say? I'll tell you about the fly in the ointment in the Swiss life

Swiss medicine is top notch, but it's also well priced. That is, seven and a half thousand people a year spend on average only on medicine. And this despite the fact that basic health care in many other countries is free. You don't need to go far, at least take the Scandinavian countries – they have a different arrangement.

Even in Switzerland, social inequality is very noticeable. I know that it is everywhere and we are generally accustomed to it, but in general the trend is such that the more developed the country, the more people with average incomes, and the very rich and the very poor – less. So in Switzerland, inequality is felt quite sharply.

Is it great to live in Switzerland, as they say? I'll tell you about a fly in the ointment in the honey barrel of Swiss life

Some drive on the roads in fancy cars, while others ride old Renaults or bikes. Some buy rolexes in Zurich boutiques, while others beg at the station. If you move away to the provinces, things are better there, but still in Switzerland there are both very rich and poor.

And it would be fine if it wasn't customary to boast of one's wealth in Switzerland, as in the same Scandinavia. But here, buying a luxury car, a watch and a suit for thousands of euros is quite a normal practice for those who can afford it. In Norway, millionaires sleep in tents at campsites, and in Switzerland they drive cars without a top. The mentality of people is very different…

To conclude, roads and infrastructure could be better. Again, depending on what to compare, but in Norway it is better. Despite the fact that the Scandinavian country is less populated, their climate is more severe and the area is larger than in Switzerland, ideal asphalt is laid to any village there. In Switzerland, sometimes there are paths like in the Ryazan region. Not everywhere, of course, but it happens.

So Switzerland also has its drawbacks, however, like everywhere else. Of course, this does not negate the incredibly high standard of living in general, but they also have their own nuances.

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